Three Peaks Challenge: Resting While You Can

The Three Peaks Challenge: Conquering the UK's three highest peaks in around 48 hours or less. An amazing challenge, that takes you across the country, to the highest points where you're greeted with the most amazing views (including the sunrise across the Lake District). But, a challenge nonetheless. A challenge, that is harder than many people think. 

You're walking the equivalent of a marathon, not to mention the elevation and lack of sleep too. So how can you prepare? One of the most important things you should prepare for is sleeping on the buses. You should have plenty of room, but there's quite a difference going from spending the night in your own bed to trying to get some shut-eye on the bus. We've outlined our top tips below on how you can best prepare for the Three Peaks Challenge, to rest while you can. 


1. Bring Bedding

One of the easiest ways to make the coach seat comfier is to make yourself at home. Bring a pillow and a blanket and you'll be all set to rest up and settle in for a good few hours kip. 

You'll be able to store the bedding on the bus whilst you trek, but do make sure it's light-weight so that it'll be easy to travel with to and from the challenge itself. 

(It'll probably be dark on the coach, so although the book is a nice thought, you may not get time in the light to read). 

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2. Set a Bed Time

Once you've decided you're going to settle in for a sleep, commit to it. Turn off any blasting music, stop playing around on your phone and get comfortable. Focussing on the road or the sky will help you to relax and get in the right mind for a good sleep. It's a good idea to make sure you don't have anything too sugary or filled with caffeine prior to settling in too. Stop anything too awakening, and don't get too frustrated if you don't fall asleep instantly. There's likely to be a lot of things going on around you, and a lot of thoughts going through your head - so try to focus on the road and get into a good headspace to sleep. 


3. Extra Comforts

A great way to get comfortable in unfamiliar surroundings is to bring some extra comforts.

Why not bring a pair of thick fluffy socks to pop on after the hours on the mountain? It'll be a great way to warm your feet, and get a little bit more settled rather than sitting in your strapped in walking boots. 

Another extra could be a sleeping mask or earplugs, they'll block out any distractions from the bus and allow you to have a full rest rather than getting woken up by lights on the road or chatter in the bus from the other participants. 


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4. Keep Warm

Alongside your thick cosy socks, it's a good idea to make sure your whole body is kept warm on the bus journeys. Temperatures drop in the night, so make sure you have plenty of layers on before you sleep so that you don't wake up due to feeling too cold. 

Having a couple of thick comfy jumpers on the bus that you don't plan to trek in would be great, they'll stay clean and dry on the coach and it'll feel similar to "getting ready for bed" when you're on the coach. 

A blanket is also great to keep your legs warm whilst you rest. 


5. Support your Head

The reason why we find it so difficult to fall into deep sleep sitting down is that during Rapid Eye Movement we lose our ability to use our muscles properly, so we doze, but find it tough to get quality sleep. The best sleeping positions when you’re traveling, are those that support as much of your body as possible. If you plan to sleep, fight for the window seat. That way you can prop your head up on the wall of the vehicle, which means you’re not relying on your stomach or neck muscles to hold you up.

Investing in a good travel pillow is always a good idea, try to find one that suits you so that when it comes to using it, you'll be at your most comfortable.